Willingness To Let Go — An Exceptional Management Quality

Photo by Headway on Unsplash

One of my best managers told me to let them know when I was looking to move on to bigger and better things. They wanted to help me grow in my career, and if that meant moving on from the company, then they were willing to help me make that transition.

I’ve been lied to many times in my career, so I had a lot of trouble trusting that statement, but it turned out to be refreshingly genuine. Even though my leaving would create more work for my manager (hiring is tough) their primary concern was helping me grow in a career and achieve my goals. For me, this is a mark of an exceptional leader. The concept seems relatively simple, but it’s something I don’t often find in management styles.

Of course, this isn’t always going to be possible with all management, especially those bound by a fiduciary duty. That said, for the vast majority of the management world, I believe this is a quality to be celebrated, praised, and encouraged.

What are your thoughts?

--

--

--

Ryder Damen is a DevOps engineer by day, and also a DevOps engineer by night. He enjoys travelling, trying new things and making the web a stranger place.

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Ryder Damen

Ryder Damen

Ryder Damen is a DevOps engineer by day, and also a DevOps engineer by night. He enjoys travelling, trying new things and making the web a stranger place.

More from Medium

Two Useful Feedback Techniques For Engineering Managers

Organizational Behavior Management: Why Is It Still Relevant For Modern Businesses?

How to run one-on-one meetings

Male and female coworker smiles and high fives each other at the office

Recruitment Resource Planning Is A Critical Business Function